equity

Supplying a more responsible, equitable classroom.

Supplying a more responsible, equitable classroom.

As we’re kicking off another exciting year of education, I’m making my annual trip to the store to resupply our classroom. And each year, I reflect on what I could buy to make my space a little more equitable for all — whether that be small things we’re unable to get at home, or just little things that make my space slightly more human-centered.

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HRP's Books of the Month: August, White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide by Carol Anderson

HRP's Books of the Month: August, White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide by Carol Anderson

“The trigger for white rage, inevitably”, writes Anderson, “is black advancement”, and Anderson follows both black advancement and white rage through the most explosive periods in America’s racial history, which the reader comes to understand through the brutal clarity and consistent facts of the historical narrative to be the story of an entitled white supremacy…

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It’s time to stop using Kahoot as a whole class review tool.

It’s time to stop using Kahoot as a whole class review tool.

Kahoot is many educators’ fan favorite. The flashy graphics and fluid design make learning “fun.” It’s way better than putting a Powerpoint up and asking multiple choice questions. I’ve used Kahoot and similar programs in the classroom, often believing they were engaging review tools. Many students are excited to play Kahoot — after all, it’s breaking the monotony of the standard school day. But as I’ve reflected and analyzed Kahoot, I’ve seen what it really is: a trivia machine.

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Data: A New Conversation

Data: A New Conversation

As a jaded educator, when I hear data, standardization, testing — anything in this tone — I am dismayed and assume the worst. And if we were to measure students in another way — say creatively or by their leadership qualities — wouldn’t this be too subjective to gauge?

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January, This Is Not a Test: A New Narrative on Race, Class, and Education by José Luis Vilson

January, This Is Not a Test: A New Narrative on Race, Class, and Education by José Luis Vilson

This Is Not a Test: A New Narrative on Race, Class, and Education by José Luis Vilson heralds a personal, provocative story of doing what’s best for children. Vilson presents a narrative of his school experience and how that has impacted his teaching, allowing a deep viewpoint into his perspective and helping us reflect on our practice.

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Accepting the Status Quo: Teaching Without Bias

Accepting the Status Quo: Teaching Without Bias

“Best practice” is defined as keeping politics separate from teaching: avoiding personal viewpoints, remaining neutral, and listening to all sides. It is ironic that the place most adverse to political influence is a cornerstone to literal constant discourse and indoctrination. The majority of educators — especially those who teach Humanities where these discussions tend to take hold — firmly believe they shouldn’t showcase their beliefs nor let students have any inkling to what they are.

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Response: The importance of rigor in bringing history to life

Response: The importance of rigor in bringing history to life

Despite the possible best intentions of those involved, their methodology is framed incorrectly and view of coursework is simply wrong. Although I recognize this work is written by a high school student, this highlights the misconceptions many feel about their own educational experience — how do you know what you’ve never been exposed to?

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